A New York Supplemental Needs Trust Can Preserve Estate Assets for an Incapacitated Person

A New York Supplemental Needs Trust (“SNT”) is a trust that allows trust funds to be available for a person who is receiving government benefits such as Medicaid or Social Security Disability (“SSD”). The governmental payments continue and are not reduced or terminated despite the existence of the trust fund. While the government sometimes may be entitled to claim a re-payment upon the death of the beneficiary, the beneficiary can utilize both the government and trust resources during life in furtherance of their quality of life.

A SNT is typically needed where a person is disabled or incapacitated and is the recipient of governmental assistance. New York Estates, Powers and Trusts Law (“EPTL”) Section 7-1.12 provides the statutory details as to the trust requirements. New York Estate and Guardianship Lawyers generally become aware that there are many different situations where a SNT can preserve assets to be used for incapacitated individuals. For example, there are situations where a person may be injured due to an accident or medical procedure and ultimately receive a large monetary award for the injuries they suffer. Sometimes the injuries also result in an incapacity that would allow the person to qualify for benefits such as Medicaid or SSD if they did not have any personal assets. In order to prevent the monetary settlement from disqualifying the person from receiving the benefits, the settlement proceeds can be placed into a SNT. The SNT trustee can then use the SNT funds in his discretion to provide additional care and benefits which are not provided through the government payments.

Many situations where a SNT is needed may involve Court proceedings such as Article 81 Guardianships in the Supreme Court or Estate Administration in the Surrogate’s Court. In these matters, the Court is asked to authorize and allow the creation of the SNT and the transfer of the funds to the SNT trustee. Court authorization allows the funds to pass directly to the trust and avoid having the incapacitated person receive these monies which would otherwise result in the disqualification or termination of the governmental benefits.

A recent case in the Nassau Surrogate’s Court is a typical example of the use and benefit of a SNT. Matter of Krushnauckas, decided by Surrogate Edward McCarty III on June 28, 2013, and reported in the New York Law Journal on August 8, 2013, concerned the estate of an individual, Adrienne, who died intestate leaving a daughter named, Michele. Michele was 56 years of age and was mentally retarded and was receiving governmental benefits in the form of Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income. Michele’s Property Management Guardian was the Public Administrator who requested that the Court approve a SNT for the approximately $400,000 estate distribution that Michele was entitled to receive. By placing the inheritance into the SNT, Michele’s Medicaid and SSI would not be affected. After reviewing the general benefits and reasons for establishing a SNT along with some issues regarding payback of benefits, the Court authorized the establishment of the trust.

The effective planning and use of a SNT in Article 81 Guardianship proceedings and Estate Settlement matters can create tremendous benefits and promote the quality of life for persons suffering from disabilities and incapacity.

New York Estates and Guardianship Attorney Jules Martin Haas, Esq. has been representing clients in New York Guardianship Proceedings throughout the past 30 years in New York, including Queens and Nassau Counties. If you or someone you know is involved with or has questions about a New York Guardianship matter, please contact me at (212) 355-2575 or email: jules.haas@verizon.net, for an initial consultation.

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